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To honour the auspicious occasion of the 80th birthday of Luang Por Liem Ṭhitadhammo (Phra Thepvajiranyan), a faithful group of disciples has arranged to print his biography. Luang Por Liem is a senior Buddhist monk presently ordained for 60 years in the Thai Forest Tradition of the late Ven. Ajahn Chah (or “Luang Pu Chah”) of Wat Nong Pah Pong in Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand. This book covers the prominent chapters of Luang Por Liem’s life, beginning from his roots as a simple farmer in Northeast Thailand, to his quest for deeper knowledge and understanding of the Buddha’s teachings as a monk, his life in accordance with the monastic discipline, his meditation practice, the search for the ...
«Quando avete visto, non c’è più nulla da vedere. Se osservate, parlerà da sé. Qualsiasi cosa sorga farà solo il suo lavoro, dandoci la possibilità di sviluppare la comprensione» ...
Within this little booklet are teachings on the nature of the mind and the world given by Luang Por Liem Thitadhammo. During a visit to Sri Lanka in March, 2013, Luang Por had this Dhamma discussion with the resident monastic community at Na Uyana Forest Monastery. The sincere interest in practising Dhamma and developing meditation led to practical and profound teachings on training the mind and understanding the world: “….The guests that come to the monastery are only visitors, just like these visiting mental states that arise in our minds. Some make us laugh, some we delight in, while others bring up aversion and disappointment. When we see them from non-delusion, then we see it all as ...
Within this little booklet are teachings on the nature of the mind and the world given by Luang Por Liem Thitadhammo. During a visit to Sri Lanka in March, 2013, Luang Por had this Dhamma discussion with the resident monastic community at Na Uyana Forest Monastery. The sincere interest in practising Dhamma and developing meditation led to practical and profound teachings on training the mind and understanding the world: “….The guests that come to the monastery are only visitors, just like these visiting mental states that arise in our minds. Some make us laugh, some we delight in, while others bring up aversion and disappointment. When we see them from non-delusion, then we see it all as ...
In the practice of Dhamma things progress bit by bit. It is not possible to force or hurry things in any way, similar to how we build this monastery. If one wants to build a monastery, one needs to proceed gradually, bit by bit. One allows for adaptations and new developments to take place during the course of the work. This also should be the attitude towards Dhamma practice. To accomplish everything in a single day is probably impossible, so we need to go step by step.
“The Ways of the Peaceful” is one of the many possible renderings of the term “Samana-Dhamma”, an expression that summarizes the whole lifestyle of a Buddhist monk. “Samana” means somebody who is peaceful. Generally in the time of the Buddha all kinds of recluses, ascetics, contemplatives, and members of ordained communities living the life of a homeless practitioner (anagarika) were referred to as “Samanas”. The Buddhas disciples were often called the “Samanas of Gotama” or the “Samanas of the Sakyan clan”, using the Buddhas family and clan names. Whenever the aspect of celibacy of these religious practitioners is stressed, the term “brahmacariya” is used, which translates in short as ...
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